Visceral fat, commonly known as belly fat, is the layer of fat below the muscles of your abdomen. Due to its crucial location surrounding many of your vital organs, belly fat supplies a constant source of energy but also exposes the body to harmful toxins and hormones. When you have too many fat cells or your fat cells get too large, they can overproduce toxins that increase your risk for chronic inflammation, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. This is why belly fat can be more dangerous than subcutaneous fat—or the outer layer of fat that you can pinch with your fingers. That said, the reason you're having trouble buttoning your pants may not be visceral fat: what we're calling "belly fat" these days could be bloating or water retention rather than a fat buildup. Read on for steps you can take to beat the bulge.
One, it's impossible to "spot reduce." While you can target certain areas of your body in terms of building up the muscles in that area, you can't decide to just lose weight in your stomach, or your thighs, or your rear. It doesn't work that way. You can't remove subcutaneous body fat from specific areas of the body by doing exercises that target those areas. Doing hundreds of crunches will certainly strengthen your abs, but that won't reduce the amount of fat stored in your torso.
I love this book. I bought the kindle version a few years back but didn't follow the diet. I just finished week 1 and lost 6.6 lbs. I'm hoping to lose more than 20 lbs at the end of 4 weeks. I will start the cycle over. I love that the book has so many options of meal and snack choices. It also shows the time to eat it. I need that written out for me. I will update again after I complete the 4th week.
The first step might be symbolic. If you bring your least-favorite diet book to the Lakeshore Athletic Club Lincoln Park, 1320 W. Fullerton Ave., at 2 p.m. Sunday, Stevens will shred it in exchange for a copy of "The Overfed Head." The destroyed books will be recycled and could possibly end up as toilet paper, a fitting end from Stevens' perspective.
Fiber is found in beans, nuts, seeds, fruits, veggies, and whole grains and foods rich in fiber tend to lend themselves to weight loss. At the moment, just 10 percentof Americans are hitting fiber targets of around 25 grams per day. Studies that track what people eat over time suggest that there’s a connection between weight and fiber intake, with higher fiber intakes linked to lower body weights (the reverse is true, too). One review of 12 studies found that supplementing the diet with more soluble fiber helped people slim down. Another year-long study found that people who followed the simple suggestion to eat 30 grams of fiber each day lost about 5 pounds.

A 2018 study among more than 600 adults who were tracked for a year concluded that while there are different paths to weight loss, the advice to limit added sugars and refined grains, add more veggies to your plate, and eat more whole foods — in other words, focusing on the quality of your diet — is the way to go. People who followed this advice lost weight without worrying about calories.
On the physiological side of things, it’s important to realize that the vast majority of your daily caloric burn comes down to just basic functions like breathing and keeping your heart beating, Moore says. Called your basal metabolic rate (BMR), your muscle does play a role in setting it, but extra muscle isn’t going to turn you into a supercharged calorie-torching machine. And even though exercise does burn calories, that total is often significantly less than what we expect and would need to create a large daily caloric deficit, he says.

In fact, a study published in 2016 in the International Journal of Obesity looked at the metabolic health markers of more than 40,0000 adults and found that nearly half of people who are overweight, and 29 percent of people classified as having obesity, were cardiometabolically healthy. It also found that more than 30 percent of people at so-called “healthy weights” had poor cardiometabolic health—which can include hypertension, high cholesterol, inflammation, and insulin resistance.
When you drink liquid carbs, like the sugar in soda, your body doesn't register them the same way as, say, a piece of bread, according to a review of studies published in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care. That means, even though you're taking in calories, your fullness cues aren't likely to signal that you're satisfied once you finish off a can. And that can lead to consuming more overall.
In order to produce the desired results, you’re going to have to submit to a slightly less academic—but utterly more chaotic—method of training. While most programs carefully manipulate a multitude of variables, we’re going to whittle that list down to those that are most conducive to fat loss and muscle preservation. It’s going to be tough, but it’s going to work.
Which leads us to point number two: If you want to lose belly fat, you'll need to lose weight. If you stick to the following plan, you won't have to lose as much weight as you might think because your body will burn more fat for energy, but still. Reducing your body fat percentage will require losing some weight. Don't go into this thinking you won't have to lose weight, because that's the surest way to fail.
But his struggle resonates with lifelong dieters. For most of his life, Stevens, now 41, believed certain foods had the power to make him fat or thin. He went on his first diet at age 10, and for 25 years he counted calories, carbs and fat while on every diet from Atkins to the Zone. He lost hundreds of pounds, but they always returned, and his weight continued to climb.

Still, it remains to be seen whether Stevens has unusual willpower or whether his idea can be translated to the masses. "Not everyone has the resolve he came to," said Laura Concannon, medical director of the bariatrics program at Illinois Masonic Medical Center, who recommends Stevens' book to overweight patients. "I think he just hit bottom, and not everyone in my practice has hit bottom. If they have, they'll do well with the approach. But they have to be ready and committed to make the change."
If you follow food trends, you might think you have to fall in love with cauliflower and kale to reap all the rewards that veggies offer, but that isn’t the case. Be it broccoli, sweet potatoes, carrots, red peppers, cabbage, spinach, or any other vegetable, the idea is to eat a variety of them and find plenty of ways to enjoy their goodness. So if you just can’t stomach steamed Brussels sprouts, try them roasted, or give sautéed Brussels sprouts a try. If raw zucchini isn’t your thing, see if you like it spiralized into noodles or grilled on a grill pan.

"With all the different tips out there, it can be tricky to understand exactly which exercises work the best. HIIT is great for fat burning and will get your heart rate up, but I’d also recommend including strength (resistance) exercises too. Try lifting weights, using resistance bands or using the weight machines at the gym as these will increase your metabolism to help with weight loss, and increase your muscle strength. It’s important to mix-up your whole-body workouts so you don’t get bored."
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