Hello my name is Melissa Renea Heggie I am 38 years old. I am from Raleigh North Carolina. I work at Kidsrkids learning academy as a Chef. My height is 5'7 my beginning weight was 230 pounds. I am now 180 that's 50 pounds down and still striving hard. My weightloss journey started January 1, 2018. Due to health problems from high blood pressure I had to take my life back. I have been grieving my mother's death since 2013 and lost myself in the process and turn to food for comfort. I decided to begin to eat clean. Make better choice so I eat low carb while foods mixed with low glycemic foods and low sodium options. It is a balance of good carbs and fresh vegetables and fruit and lean protein. I began doing Jillian Michaels beginners shred at 4 am and at 4pm I do Ripped in 30 and kickboxing blast by Jillian Michaels. Monday through Friday. Saturday I do Jullian Michaels extreme shed and shred the full hour. Sunday I do Jullian Michaels beginners shred and I rest. Her DVDs has changed my body composition. I am focus on fat loss and being medication free. I want to share my story to let others know they can do it to. My calorie count is around 1700 a day. My carb count around 100 grams a day my sodium Intake is around 1000 mg a day and my overall health is better. I am in my 4th month and 50 pounds down I strive for an healthy BMI one day very soon.


When the going gets tough (and it likely will from time to time along any weight loss journey), it’s important to realize that a host of non-food factors can make losing weight difficult, explains board-certified obesity medicine specialist Spencer Nadolsky, D.O., a diplomate of the American Board of Obesity Medicine and author of The Fat Loss Prescription. Hormones, genetics, and, ultimately, metabolism are three big ones, he says.
Spending more time in the kitchen can help you shed belly fat, as long as you’re cooking with the right foods, according to one 2017 study. After analyzing data from more than 11,000 men and women, UK researchers found that people who ate more than five homemade meals per week were 28 percent less likely to have a high body mass index, and 24 percent less likely to carry too much body fat than those whole only downed three meals at home.
Being in optimal ketosis for a prolonged period of time (say, a month) will ensure that you experience the maximal hormonal effect from eating a low-carb diet. If this doesn’t result in noticeable weight loss, you can be certain that too many carbs are NOT part of your weight issue and not the obstacle to your weight loss. There are, in fact, other causes of obesity and being overweight. The next three tips in this series might help you.
Don’t let extra hours lounging in bed stand between you and a flatter belly. While getting enough sleep can help boost your metabolic rate, sleeping in may undo any benefit you’d enjoy from catching a few extra winks. One Obesity study reveals that late sleepers who snoozed past 10:45 in the morning ate nearly 250 more calories over the course of the day, despite eating half as many fruits and vegetables as their early bird counterparts. Even worse, they chowed down on more salty, sugary, and trans-fat-laden fast food than those who woke up earlier. If you happen to head out of the house early, you’re in for an additional metabolic boost; researchers at Northwestern University have found that people exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMIs than their late-waking counterparts.

In a new study, Stanford University researchers put more than 600 overweight adults on either a healthy low-fat or low-carb diet. It turns out, participants had similar levels of weight loss success on each plan. Researchers looked for clues (such as insulin levels and gene patterns) to see if there are any factors that might make someone more successful on either diet, but after combing through the data, they were not able to make any connections. Since it may take years before scientists discover individual traits that could lead to more success on one plan compared to another, for now, we can learn a lot — and lose a lot! — by recognizing the dieting advice that all experts agree on.

"When we’re lacking in sleep, our body’s hormones get thrown off balance which can impact our hunger levels the next day. We all have two hormones that affect our appetite: ghrelin and leptin. When we don’t get enough sleep, our ghrelin levels (the hormone that makes us feel hungry) rise, and our leptin levels (the hormone that makes us feel full) drop. This means that when we’re awake, we tend to eat more but feel less satisfied. Try going to bed a little earlier than usual to avoid this imbalance and remember to remove any distractions that might prevent you from nodding off."
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